Steven Van den Berghe

In previous posts, we looked at how digitally optimising support functions can significantly reduce the total cost of existing services. But they can also be used to develop new value creators.

Steven Van den Berghe

Optimising the service chain with digital technologies can significantly reduce the total cost of services. Example service flows that can be made more efficient include pre-sales/sales, marketing, commissioning, after-sales support, repair, …. The cost reduction can come from direct efficiency improvements. But also indirect, and previously unharvested synergies, between units can yield significant results.

Steven Van den Berghe

Analog servitisation requires a linear (or more) scaling of personnel and local presence, either in-house or through an affiliates network. Digital servitisation is to services, what hyperscaling is to software: to deliver the same or more services at a global scale, with significantly less personnel and more centralised presence.

Steven Van den Berghe

Digital servitisation is one of the models in the masterplan innovation that has been receiving extra attention at Sirris. It is a perfect example of how technological innovations come together to transform businesses.

Steven Van den Berghe

The servitisation of products is a strategy of capturing value by adding services to products or even by replacing a product with a service. Traditionally, the delivery of those services depends in large part on human intervention and resources. Customer-focused services are laborious and entail high costs for service delivery. They only scale linearly with human resources. This makes the scaling up of services problematic as it limits the extent to which a company can provide services. As a result, service delivery is outsourced to partners or local players are filling in the service gap.