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Producing precision parts cost-effectively

Precision manufacturing allows manufacturing companies to make ‘products of the future’ and so enhance their competitiveness. With its state-of-the-art infrastructure and expertise, Sirris helps companies to design adapted production processes while keeping costs under control.

Innovative product features and strict performance requirements demand ever more precise parts. Precision manufacturing allows manufacturing companies to make ‘products of the future’ and so enhance their competitiveness. With its state-of-the-art infrastructure and expertise, Sirris helps companies to design adapted production processes while keeping costs under control.

“Precision manufacturing allows manufacturing companies to make ‘products of the future’ and so enhance their competitiveness.”

Projects in 2015

  • Roadshow ‘Precision Manufacturing for new and better products’: This series of workshops for technical experts, managers and industrial entrepreneurs examined a number of key aspects of precision manufacturing and illustrated them with case studies from industry. There were also visits to manufacturing firms that have fully mastered the issue at hand.
     
  • Series of white papers on competitiveness in precision manufacturing (six domains): A broad survey by Sirris of Belgian manufacturing companies and their main subcontractors identified six areas in which such firms can excel in precision manufacturing:
    • Developing precision components with short lead times
    • High-quality surface finish
    • Finishing near-net-shape components
    • Processing little details on large surfaces
    • Precision processing for hard and brittle materials
    • Guaranteeing precision over the whole batch
       
    In six free white papers, we explain in detail the challenges and opportunities of precision production for Belgian manufacturing companies.
     
  • Precision model as framework: Sirris developed a precision model, a soft of overview enabling manufacturing companies to achieve greater precision in their milling processes. The model allows them to identify the different causes of imprecision by means of set procedures.
     
  • Feasibility study on laser hardening: Conventional hardening in a furnace is time-consuming and results in inaccuracies, so demand for alternative methods is growing, particularly for the manufacture of precision components. Sirris investigated the possibilities of integrating laser technology in the hardening process during precision manufacturing. A feasibility study in partnership with KU Leuven and industry found that integrated laser hardening could reduce the lead time of precision components by 90%.
     

Which projects are we working on now?

  • Combining precision and additive manufacturing: For complex metal parts, current 3D-printing technology does not yet offer the required precision. Post-processing is often necessary, but clamping or securing complex shapes is far from easy. Sirris is therefore looking for ways to combine 3D printing of complex metal parts with the required precision.
     
  • Precision manufacturing in digital factories: Monitoring signals during the manufacturing process provides a wealth of information about the behaviour of machines and materials during the various processing steps. Identifying low-frequency signals has been possible for some time, but Sirris is now investigating whether it is also possible to monitor high-frequency signals. By capturing and analysing a range of signals throughout the process, it is possible to intervene more proactively in order to guide and adjust the manufacturing process.
     
  • Functionalising surfaces: Texturing surfaces with micro- and even nanometer-scale features can confer additional functionality such as water-resistance, reduced friction or optical effects. Such value-added surfaces can be applied to mechanical precision components using femtosecond lasers.

 

Discover our full range of precision manufacturing services.